SCHOLARSHIP/RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES

We are always looking for excellent students and postdocs, and Australia/UNSW provides excellent opportunities for scholarship and awards.  If you are interested in joining the team, please contact me at your convenience. Also be sure to check out the links below regarding scholarship opportunities.

 

Graduate Research Scholarships

Domestic Research Scholarships

International Research Scholarships

Home Country Joint Scholarships

SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

We are always looking for excellent students and postdocs, and Australia/UNSW provides excellent opportunities for scholarship and awards.  If you are interested in joining the team, please contact me at your convenience. Also be sure to check out the links below regarding scholarship opportunities.

 

Graduate Research Scholarships

Domestic Research Scholarships

International Research Scholarships

Home Country Joint Scholarships

 

VIP: Biotic Hydrofuel

Project Summary: Through the ChallEng program at UNSW, our research group is leading a Vertically Integrated Program (VIP), Biotic Hydrofuel, on transforming food and brewery waste into clean hydrogen fuel.  Using electrolysis as the driving force, our technology aims to not only generate hydrogen, but also transform waste streams into valuable hydrocarbon feedstocks.  VIPs are targeted toward undergraduate and masters by coursework students at UNSW, providing an excellent laboratory experience while earning course credits.  Our team not only consists of members of the Bedford Research Group, but also switcH2 Engineering (Australia’s hottest new startup company), members of UNSW PartCat, and members of the UNESCO Centre for Membrane Science and Technology Contact us if you are an interested student at UNSW.

Read full project description.

 

Project Title: Uncovering Molecular Orientation and Structure at Biosensor Surfaces.

Project Summary:
The interface between biological molecules and abiotic surfaces is central to the performance of new materials in a wide range of applications spaces including biosensors, biomedical implants and nanoparticle sensing. While understanding the biotic/abiotic
interface is an area of intense study, a thorough comprehension of atomic-scale mechanisms for biomolecular binding, conformation, and surface orientation at these interfaces is lacking. Using an integrated experimental-computational approach, atomic-scale biomolecule structure and morphology at the biotic/abiotic interface will be thoroughly elucidated for graphene electrodes and metallic nanoparticles, platforms central multiple next generation technologies. In collaboration with research teams in the 711th Human Performance Wing of the US Air Force Research Laboratory, this project focuses on
the orientation and morphology of biorecognition elements (BRE) of relevance to real time human performance sensing platforms. In doing so, we will establish fundamental, binding, conformation, and orientation rules for the biotic/abiotic interface. The combination of experiment and modeling will enable insights beyond what either could afford by themselves.

This project is funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and involves the use of synchrotron facilities in Australia and the US. Key techniques: Soft X-ray spectroscopy and resonant scattering methods will be central to this project’s success. A prospective student must be interested in understanding the fundamentals of such experiments. The project involves a multidisciplinary team in Australia and the US and must be able to work in a highly collaborative environment.
Environment: The project will be undertaken with the Bedford Research Group in the School of Chemical Engineering which is part of the Particle and Catalysis Research Group.

For further information, please visit:
www.pcrg.unsw.edu.au

 

Project Title: Single Atom Catalysts and Nanoclusters Supported on Nanoscale Silicon Carbide/Nitrides for the Partial Oxidation of Methane using Tunable Preceramic Polymer Templates.

Project Summary:
The partial oxidation of methane is an intriguing route toward the
production of syngas at stoichiometries directly amendable
to methanol synthesis and/or Fischer-Tropsch reactions. This
reaction is notoriously tricky to maintain, as it is often plagued with selectivity issues (i.e. total oxidation to CO2), or catalyst deactivation through coke formation. Additionally, the understanding of catalyst processing and structure is poorly understood, limiting logical decisions on catalyst design. This project aims to develop new materials with improved reactivity using single atom catalysts supported on silicon carbide/nitride supports made via block copolymer templating approaches. Preceramic polymers act as a precursor to form silicon carbide/nitride nanomaterials, while blending with appropriate catalyst metal precursors yields the final catalyst. To best understand how the materials are formed during processing and during partial oxidation of methane reactions, in-situ synchrotron characterization methods will be used to form structure/function relationships for these novel materials. The PhD project is funded through the American Chemical Society’s Petroleum Research Fund, and will necessitate an array of skills including particle synthesis, materials characterization and catalytic performance assessment. The student will be expected to participate in the Annual ACS Spring Meeting in Years 2 and 3 of their PhD.

Download full project description.

Project Title: Tailorable Ceramic Nanocomposites through Polymer Chemistry

Project Summary:
Preceramic polymers provide unique ways to process otherwise cumbersome ceramic materials into interesting shapes and morphology at the nano, micro, and macro scale. The use of
polymeric precursors further enables new chemistries and synthetic pathway not achievable using traditional ceramic
processing. Yet the field is still in it infancy, and understanding how polymer chemistry and processing conditions influence the materials final structure and properties remains unknown. This project, in collaboration with the US Air Force Research Laboratory, aims to fill this void in fundamental knowledge by using a suite of advanced in-situ synchrotron structural characterization tools to understand how structure and polymer chemistry influences properties. The PhD project is funded through the Asian Office of Aerospace Development, where the student will be expected to participate in synchrotron experiments at the Advanced Photon Source and Cornell High-Energy Synchrotron Source in the US throughout the project. Key techniques: Structural characterization of polymeric materials, the final ceramic nanocomposite, and the transitional structure in between is critical for the success of this project. As such, a prospective student should be eager to learn about various advanced characterization techniques, including X-ray absorption spectroscopy, small angle X-ray scattering, high-energy X-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy.  Environment: The project will be undertaken with the Bedford Research Group in the School of Chemical Engineering which is part of the Particle and Catalysis Research Group.

Download full project description.

 

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University of New South Wales, 422 Hilmer Building, NSW 2052, Sydney

+61 (2) 9385 7518

bedfordresearchgroup@gmail.com